Sunday, June 23, 2013

Sophia and Sirch - "Gli Amici" di Feudi di San Gregorio-Wine Tasting on the Run

As I mentioned in my last post, I had only a few hours at VitignoItalia a few weeks ago.  My mission, per se, was to taste wines that I hadn't tried before...or hadn't tried in a long time.  There was a stand, though, that I couldn't pass up.  One that has made me feel part of their large family every time I visit them in their winery, stop by their Michelin star restaurant Marenna', or see them on the road.  Feudi di San Gregorio.  I stopped by to say hello to familiar faces such as my maestro/amico Alessandro Palmieri, my sommelier course classmate Carmine Di Costanzo, and of course the ever smiling Antonio Fiore who was pouring that afternoon.  I asked Fiore for something new to me.  A white wine or two that I hadn't tried.  Was there something? I wondered.
Fiore reached into the ice bucket and pulled out a bottle .  A wine produced by Azienda Basilisco in the Basilicata region which Feudi di San Gregorio acquired a couple of years ago.  Bravo, Antonio.  I thought. This one I hadn't tasted, and I was very curious of the Fiano, Traminer, and Malvasia blend that I was about to try.  I introduced myself to Sophia Basilicata Bianca IGP 2011.  Sophia with her lightly intense and interesting aromas of fresh fruit that greeted me in that medieval Neapolitan castle that early afternoon.  Fresh. Friendly.  Flavorful.

Time to move on.
My eyes caught a few labels with a familiar name.  Sirch.  From Azienda Agricola Sirch from the Fruili Venezia Giulia region.  What were these wines ding at the Feudi stand?  Well, this winery is the brainchild of Feudi's agronomist and general manager Pierpaolo Sirch.  I'm a big fan of Sirch, so I was excited to get the chance to taste his wines made up north.  I quickly tried three of the whites.  The 2012 vintages of Sauvignon...

Ribolla Gialla...

and Malvasia...

Each wine was an excellent representation of the variety.  My amico Di Costanzo and I discussed this for awhile.  The Sauvignon tasted like a Sauvignon.  Ribolla Gialla a Ribolla Gialla.  Malvasia...the same.  And that's what you want when you open a bottle of white.  You want to degustare, taste, the grape variety...the territory.  You don't want extras.  At least I don't.  And sure, these were different than the whites that Sirch works with when he is in the southern vineyards in Sorbo Serpico at Feudi di San Gregorio.  And they should be.
That afternoon my wine tasting on the run was not only a time to catch up with old friends....it was also a time to meet new ones...
Sophia and Sirch...



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